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Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino headshot

IMDb:https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000233/

Height:6' 1" (1.85 m)

Trademarks:Lead characters usually drive General Motors vehicles, particularly Chevrolet and Cadillac, such as Jules' 1974 Nova and Vincent's 1960s Malibu. Briefcases and suitcases play an important role in Pulp Fiction (1994), Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jackie Brown (1997), True Romance (1993) and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004). Makes references to cult movies and television Frequently works with Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Uma Thurman, Michael Bowen, Samuel L. Jackson, 'Michael Parks' and Christoph Waltz. His films usually have a shot from inside a car trunk He always has a Dutch element in his films: The opening tune, "Little Green Bag", in Reservoir Dogs (1992) was performed by George Baker Selection and written by Jan Gerbrand Visser and Benjamino Bouwens who are all Dutch. The character Freddy Newandyke, played by Tim Roth is a direct translation to a typical Dutch last name, Nieuwendijk. The code name of Tim Roth is Mr. Orange, the royal color of Holland and the last name of the royal family. The Amsterdam conversation in Pulp Fiction (1994), Vincent Vega smokes from a Dutch tobacco shag (Drum), the mentioning of Rutger Hauer in Jackie Brown (1997), the bride's name is Beatrix, the name of the Royal Dutch Queen. [The Mexican Standoff] All his movies (including True Romance (1993), which he only wrote and did not direct) feature a scene in which three or more characters are pointing guns at each other at the same time. Often uses an unconventional storytelling device in his films, such as retrospect (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), non-linear (Pulp Fiction (1994)), or "chapter" format (_Kill Bill: Vol.1 (2003)_). His films will often include one long, unbroken take where a character is followed around somewhere. Often casts comedians in small roles: Steven Wright as the disc jockey in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Kathy Griffin as an accident witness and Julia Sweeney as the junkyard guy's daughter in Pulp Fiction (1994), Chris Tucker as Beaumont in Jackie Brown (1997), Mike Myers as General Ed Fenech in Inglourious Basterds (2009), and Jonah Hill in Django Unchained (2012). Widely imitated quick cuts of character's hands performing actions in extreme closeup, a technique reminiscent of Brian De Palma. Long close-up of a person's face while someone else speaks off-screen (close-up of The Bride while Bill talks, of Butch while Marsellus talks). [Aliases] He uses aliases in nearly all of his movies: Honey Bunny and Pumpkin from Pulp Fiction (1994), Mr White, Blonde, Orange etc. from Reservoir Dogs (1992). Bill's team in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) (Black Mamba, Copperhead, Cottonmouth, and California Mountain Snake), The Basterds and other major characters in Inglourious Basterds (2009) [Director's Cameo] Often plays a small role in all his films (ex.) (Mr. Brown in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Jimmie Dimmick in Pulp Fiction (1994), the answering machine voice in Jackie Brown (1997), The Rapist in Grindhouse (2007) and Warren in Death Proof (2007)). Frequently uses mêlée weapons, such as the "samurai sword" (Katana) that Butch uses in Pulp Fiction (1994) and The Bride uses in the Kill Bill films, also the stake attached to a jackhammer used by George Clooney in From Dusk Till Dawn (1996). Extreme violence, much of which is suggested off-screen Frequently has a female character who wears a black and white pant suit (Uma Thurman in Pulp Fiction (1994), Pam Grier in Jackie Brown (1997), Daryl Hannah in Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)). Often creates fictional brands of objects due to his dislike of product placement. The Red Apple cigarettes and Big Kahuna burger established in Pulp Fiction (1994) are often referenced in his other films. Frequently sets his films in Los Angeles, California Often frames characters with doorways and shows them opening and closing doors. Minor character dialogue is off-screen in his films A character cooly talks through an intense situation, either delaying the occurrence of violence or avoiding it through resolution. Interjects scenes with introduction of a character's background (Hugo Stieglitz is introduced in the middle of the Nazi torture scene in _Inglorious Basterds (2009)_, O-Ren is introduced with an interuption in the main story in _Kill Bill: Vol.1 (2003)_). Frequently uses Spanish classical guitar for the soundtracks Known for giving comebacks to "forgotten" actors and/or cult actors by giving them important roles in his movies: John Travolta (Pulp Fiction (1994)), David Carradine (Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)), Lawrence Tierney (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), Pam Grier (Jackie Brown (1997)), Robert Forster (Jackie Brown (1997)), Shin'ichi Chiba (Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003))... even in smaller/cameo roles: Sid Haig (Jackie Brown (1997), Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004)), Edward Bunker (Reservoir Dogs (1992)), Rod Taylor in _Inglorious Basterds (2009)_) and Michael Parks (Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003), and_From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)_), most recently with Jennifer Jason Leigh in The Hateful Eight (2015) Frequently references his home state Tennessee in his films: In Pulp Fiction (1994), Butch plans to meet his connection in Knoxville, which is also where his grandfather bought the gold watch; the song "Tennessee Stud" by Johnny Cash appears in Jackie Brown (1997); Death Proof (2007) is set in Lebanon, Tennessee; Lt.. Aldo Raine in Inglourious Basterds (2009) hails from Maynardville, Tennessee. Often interjects titles to tell the audience of a new portion of the story. (Character names in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Chapter form in Inglourious Basterds (2009), Explanations of what audience will see such as in Pulp Fiction (1994)) Characters frequently use the phrase bingo Indulging his foot fetish by filming shots with only a woman's bare feet (Uma Thurman is barefoot in the introduction of Mia in Pulp Fiction (1994) and while the Bride is sitting in the back of Buck's truck trying to move her big toe in _Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)_. In Death Proof (2007) Sydney Tamiia Poitier (Jungle Julia) is barefoot almost constantly and Rosario Dawson (Abernathy) has her feet hanging out the window of a car while she is asleep) or characters who discuss bare feet (Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) discusses the ethics of foot massages with Vincent (John Travolta) in Pulp Fiction (1994), In Death Proof (2007) Abernathy (Rosario Dawson) talks about Stuntman Mike ('Kurt Russell') bumping into her feet when he walks by. Prefers to start most of his films with a scene before the main titles are shown All of his films feature one or more scenes in a restaurant Characters often utilize sharp, bladed weapons. (Mr. Blonde uses a straight razor to cut off Marvin Nash's ear in Reservoir Dogs (1992), Butch uses a samurai sword to kill Maynard in Pulp Fiction (1994), The Bride uses a samurai sword to kill several characters in _Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)_ and _Kill Bill Vol. 2 (2004)_, Lt. Aldo Raine uses a Bowie knife to cut a swastika in Col. Hans Landa's forehead in _Inglorious Basterds (2009)_, Vernita Greene fights The Bride with a butcher knife in _Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)_) Often shows a relationship between an older experienced character and a younger character in a manner similar to a parent or teacher Cleft chin His characters often discuss their favorite films or series while carrying out their activities His films often feature at least one character who is deeply religious or spiritual and tries to reconcile that faith with their actions (Jules in Pulp Fiction (1994), Jacob in From Dusk Till Dawn (1996)). Revenge is a common theme in his films Often frames dialogue scenes around a character preparing food, usually intercut with close-ups of their hands and food items: Vernita Green making her daughter cereal in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003), Bill making B.B. a sandwich in Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004), Hans Landa offering Shosanna Dreyfus a strudel in Inglourious Basterds (2009), King Schultz pouring beers in Django Unchained (2012). Usually when giving an interview, he will greet the audience with a peace sign Many of his protagonists are morally suspect, violent-tempered individuals who ultimately best their antagonists by outmatching them in sheer brutality Colorful main antagonists with an elaborately thoughtout, vivid but extremely twisted (and often bigoted) world view and philosophy Scenes are more often than not loaded with homages or visual references to other director's works Often times, the violence in his films is over exagerrated and rooted in a darkly comic context. Never includes his name in a director's credit in the opening titles of his films. The credits always end with the name of his producer(s). Soundtracks often feature dialogue from their respective films. It is common for the antagonist character in Quentin Tarantino films to have a low or non-existent on-screen body count, although many can be seen to torture others, kill off-screen or order others to kill. Mr. Blonde from Reservoir Dogs (1992), Marsellus Wallace from Pulp Fiction (1994), Bill from _Kill Bill Vol. 1 (2003)_ and _Kill Bill Vol. 2 (2004)_ and Calvin Candie from Django Unchained (2012) don't kill anyone on-screen, Hans Landa from Inglourious Basterds (2009) kills one person on-screen, Ordell from Jackie Brown (1997) kills two on-screen but Stuntman Mike from Death Proof (2007) kills several on-screen. Almost always uses pre-recorded music for his films Frantic scenes are often intercut with a character taking their time and behaving methodically

Source:https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000233/

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Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood

Directed By: Quentin Tarantino Starring: Margot Robbie, Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt...
Releasing in UK cinemas Wednesday 14th August 2019 Age Rating: TBC Language: English Next Showing: In 1 cinema on Thursday 15th August 2019. View Listings
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Last update was at 06:36 19th June 2019